NASA's Juno mission at Jupiter

NASA's Juno mission at Jupiter

Jupiter is giant. So incredibly giant over 1300 Earths could fit under it's swirling surface layer. It is basically a small unlighted star, having the same recipe of hydrogen, helium and a few heavier elements as our local stellar energy source. It's also (in my opinion) the scariest thing in our entire solar system. I mean it! A giant 400 year old storm the size of our planet.. a magnetic field powerful enough to keep the core of one of it's moons molten... weird boiling rifts of swirling gasses over an ocean that (maybe) runs clear to the center. Oh, and lightning spanning thousands of miles in a single strike.

One time - when I was in High School - Jupiter took a direct hit from a sizable comet traveling at interplanetary velocities and guess what? Gone. Swallowed. Whatever. Jupiter doesn't care.

NASA's Juno probe is there right now, making closeup passes and sending back pictures and measurements that extend down through the upper layers of clouds to hopefully reveal more about this gas giant's structure. I've been staying tuned to JPL's website and reading everything I can as the data comes in.

Like so many things, the best way to alleviate fear of a thing is to understand it. I heartily recommend the scientific method, and the use of well engineered space hardware. Jupiter is not personal. It's not out to get you. Just don't fall in to it.

If you want to actually know something about the Juno mission, check out this well produced video from NASA:

You can read all sorts of other stuff on the NASA website here: https://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/juno/main/index.html

A great online gear generator

A great online gear generator

This is my interstellar spacecraft

This is my interstellar spacecraft

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